Culture

Coliseu do Porto – A symbol of the city’s culture
5 December, 2017 / ,

More than a building that marks the landscape of downtown, the Coliseum of Porto (Coliseu do Porto) is an example of overcoming difficulties and the way the people of Porto defend their symbols.

The current building was inaugurated on December 19, 1941, reflecting on a project in which several architects participated and the Modernism that marked the end of the 30’s. However, in the place where the Coliseum is today , there was the Jardim Passos Manuel Hall, a place not only for cinema shows, but also for parties, a music hall and painting exhibitions that had been built in the beginning of the 20th century. The success of this concept led the owner to consider enlarging it. In 1938 the Coliseum began to be built, and was inaugurated with a Gala soiree. This inaugural concert was revived during the celebrations of the 50th anniversary.

From its inauguration, until the end of the 60’s, the theater received cinema, concerts, operas and circuses. Renowned names like Marcel Marceau and Rudolf Nureyev passed by during that period. In the 70’s, the Coliseum also welcomed the Cine-Studio Passos Manuel, a smaller room dedicated to the author’s cinema.

There were two of the most striking episodes in the life of the Coliseum in the mid-1990s: in 1995 rumors surfaced that it would be sold to the Universal Church of the Kingdom of God, which led hundreds of people to protest for several days in front of the building. Due to the pressure, the company owner finally agreed to sell the building to the Association of Friends of the Coliseum of Porto, which emerged from this wave of solidarity between artists, cultural agents and anonymous figures.

 

On September 28 of the following year, and a few hours after the Portugal Fashion shows finished, a tragic event in the Coliseum and the city came about: a fire destroyed the stage, damaging the room and the dressing rooms. Once again, institutions, companies and private individuals united in an exemplary effort, ensuring the reopening of the Coliseum in December of that year, fulfilling, as always, the tradition of receiving the Christmas Circus.

The Coliseum modernized in the late 90’s and today remains one of the main stages of the city.

The “twin” churches
5 December, 2017 / ,

They stand side by side, separated by a narrow house. The Carmo and Carmelitas churches seem to be one, but they have very different stories.

Between these two churches lies the narrowest building in the city, which gives access to the bell tower. However, to get there, it is necessary to climb three floors and go over the dome of the Carmelite church.

The Church of the Carmelitas was the first to be built and is next to the old Convent of Our Lady of Porto (now GNR headquarters). It is a church of the seventeenth century, with a classic façade and exuberant interior, in Porto rococo wood carving. It was the first house of the Order of the Discalced Carmelites monks. The foundation stone was laid on May 5, 1619, and the work was completed in 1622.

The Carmo Church is more recent, dating back to the second half of the eighteenth century. Thus, the rococo style (characterized by a huge profusion of decorative details) is much more evident, both in the exterior and interior architecture. The tiles that cover the lateral facade were placed in 1912. They were designed by Silvestre Silvestri and are allusive to the cult of Our Lady.

Rua Sá da Bandeira
7 November, 2017 / , , ,

From the little farms and alleys a cosmopolitan street was born.

Today it is one of the most central and busiest streets of Porto, but it was a place formerly occupied by agricultural land, alleys and even stalls.

The name of the street itself has a curious story: Bernardo Sá Nogueira de Figueiredo was a marshal loyal to the Liberals troops. During the Siege of Porto, in the war between Liberals and Absolutists, the arm that carried the liberal flag was severed by the enemy. It would be known as Sá da Bandeira. Later he took up important political positions, even becoming a minister. He was also distinguished with the titles of Baron, Viscount and Marquis.

Rua Sá da Bandeira only appeared in the 19th century: until then, it was still an area with small  farms and farmland, many of them belonging to D. Antónia Adelaide Ferreira (A Ferreirinha), one of the most important names in the history of Port Wine. The area also had small alleys, which were almost completely demolished.

The street began to be constructed in 1836, but the first houses would only appear seven years later. In 1875 it was extended to Rua Formosa and the continuation until Rua de Fernandes Tomás (1904) which forced the demolition of the stables where the horses, which pulled the public transport, were at the time. Later, the street would be extended to the South and later to the North, until it gained its present form.

 

Points of interest

 

Sá da Bandeira Theater

It opened in 1870, but earlier there had been more rudimentary structures for spectacles. It was here that in 1895, Sarah Bernhardt performed, and it was also here that the first films which were made in Portugal were shown. It is said to have been the first theater in Porto to use electric lighting.

 

 

 

Bolhão Market

O mercado mais tradicional da cidade foi construído em cima de uma bolha de água (daí o seu nome). Datado de 1850, é um belo exemplo da arquitetura neoclássica, mas é o seu interior, onde a alma Porto está mais presente. Os produtos frescos, a simpatia dos vendedores e a frescura dos produtos tradicionais portugueses merecem uma visita.

 

 

Palácio do Comércio

A residential building, with commerce and offices, which surprises by its magnificence. It is worth beholding the sculptures of horses that are at the top, as well as all its architecture. It was built in the 1940s by the couple of architects David Moreira da Silva and Maria José Marques da Silva, daughter of José Marques da Silva, one of the most important architects of the city.

 

 

 

A Brasileira Café

It is currently under construction to become a hotel, but this is a building with history. In 1903, Adriano Teles, who had been an emigrant in Brazil, opened this cafe to make known his own brand of coffee. During the decades of 50 and 60 was habitual place of get-togethers and gatherings.

The day the king visited Oporto
13 October, 2017 / ,

In November and December 1908 D. Manuel II, who would  become the last king of Portugal, made a long journey to the north of the country  and spent several days in Oporto.

On one of these days, and after his mother, Queen Amélia, having shopped in a large store in the city, the people gathered at Campo da Regeneração (currently Praça da República) for a military parade. The newspapers of the time headlined that many people went up to the rooftops to watch the parade, however, cars, trams that headed to the place had to turn back due to the concentration of people.

The Royal cortege toured several streets of the Baixa and on Rua de Santa Catarina, they were received with a shower of flowers. At the end of the day a gala dinner was held at Palácio dos Carrancas. Dona Amelia had a full day, having visited the atelier of the sculptor Teixeira Lopes.

After having traveled several localities of the north, D. Manuel II returned to Oporto, having participated in a soirée at Ateneu Comercial of Porto. In another tribute to the king, the baths of Praia do Ourigo were named after the King. In October of 1910 the Republic was implanted and the designation was forever forgotten.

Source: The Tripeiro 7th grade Year XVI Number 1 and 2 February 1997

Porto in miniature
8 May, 2017 /

The main monuments of the city of Porto in miniature in an exhibition that can be seen in the shopping center La Vie Porto Baixa Center until May 15.

There are about 20 miniature buildings, which depict precisely all the details of the iconic landmarks in the city. The “Porto em Miniatura” exhibition can be seen on several floors of this shopping center in Porto downtown (Baixa), bringing together some of the most important monuments of the city, such as the Clérigos Tower (which in this exhibition is only “two meters high) São Bento Station, the jail of Relation, the Cathedral of Porto and the Church of Cedofeita.

These pieces belong to a private collection by Agostinho Conceição Gonçalves Teixeira, a genuine “tripeiro” (Porto resident) who, between the 30s and 50s of the last century, dedicated himself to scale models the main landmarks of Invicta(Porto) .

The show, sponsored by Hey Porto, has free admission.

“They are models that portray Porto of the past and memories, focusing on the main monuments of the city, with masterly precise details,” says Francisco Almeida Lemos, promoter of the initiative and current owner of this collection.

 

In this initiative Hey Porto promotes a contest, challenging its readers to take photographs of the miniature monuments present at the exhibition and the real ones. Then you can send your photos to e-mailgeral@heyporto.com together with name, nationality and date of birth. The images will then be evaluated by the Hey Porto team. The 10 best photos receive a free entrance to climb to the Clérigos Tower and will be published in the Hey Porto June edition.

 

 

La Vie Porto Baixa Center

Rua Fernandes Tomás 506/508 Porto

Schedules:

Monday to Saturday: 9 a.m. to 10 p.m.

Sunday: 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.

 

 

 

Bolhão Market through the eyes of two Americans
23 April, 2017 / , ,

The Undiscovered Food Stories of Northern Portugal mentions the Bolhão Market as the character of the book. With texts by Gabriella Opaz and Sonia Andresson and photos by Ryan Opaz, this book which is written in English, is a declaration of love to one of the most mythical places in Porto.

Bolhão is the central point of the stories that are told here: the sellers who are the soul of the market, but also the products that are sold there daily, including recipes of typical dishes and their regions.

The book TheUndiscoveredFoodStoriesofNorthern Portugal, by GabriellaOpaz and Sónia Andresson (Book Workshop), was nominated for the Special Prize of the prestigious GourmandWorldCookbookAwards, also known as the “Oscars” of the kitchen.

 

GabriellaOpaz, one of the authors, revealed to Hey Porto that the inspiration for this book was  the market sellers themselves and the they d manner in which they deal  with hardtimes, always contributing to preserve the Portuguese cultural heritage. Among the many products on sale in the market, GabriellaOpaz highlights the Avintes broa, the succulent olives of the Douro and the fish.

 

The Undiscovered Food Stories of Northern Portugal

GabriellaOpaz and SoniaAndresson

Available for sale at: https://store.catavino.net/

January 31, 1891 – A revolution that ended in bloodshed
3 March, 2017 / ,

On January 31, 1891, the first attempt to establish the Republic took place in Porto. Discontented with the economic crisis and a British-launched Ultimatum, which called into question the Portuguese presence in Africa, a group of influential northern men led dozens of soldiers toward the center of the city with the intention of taking the Post Office and Telegraphs and proclaim the Republic. They were eventually blocked by the municipal guard, faithful to the Monarchy and placed on the steps of the Church of Santo Ildefonso.

The Republic came to be proclaimed on the balcony of the City Hall, which would be the last stronghold of the rebels. Those who did not die in the battle would eventually be taken to ships stationed at Leixões. Others managed to escape abroad. The Republic would only be proclaimed in 1910.

The memory of this date still remains today in the toponymy of the city, with Rua 31 de Janeiro, in downtown Porto, as well as in the streets that have the names of the authors of this frustrated revolution: Alves da Veiga, Rodrigues de Freitas or Alferes Malheiro.

Source: O Tripeiro (New Series) Year X number 1