History

The day the king visited Oporto
13 October, 2017 / ,

In November and December 1908 D. Manuel II, who would  become the last king of Portugal, made a long journey to the north of the country  and spent several days in Oporto.

On one of these days, and after his mother, Queen Amélia, having shopped in a large store in the city, the people gathered at Campo da Regeneração (currently Praça da República) for a military parade. The newspapers of the time headlined that many people went up to the rooftops to watch the parade, however, cars, trams that headed to the place had to turn back due to the concentration of people.

The Royal cortege toured several streets of the Baixa and on Rua de Santa Catarina, they were received with a shower of flowers. At the end of the day a gala dinner was held at Palácio dos Carrancas. Dona Amelia had a full day, having visited the atelier of the sculptor Teixeira Lopes.

After having traveled several localities of the north, D. Manuel II returned to Oporto, having participated in a soirée at Ateneu Comercial of Porto. In another tribute to the king, the baths of Praia do Ourigo were named after the King. In October of 1910 the Republic was implanted and the designation was forever forgotten.

Source: The Tripeiro 7th grade Year XVI Number 1 and 2 February 1997

Synagogues of Porto
23 April, 2017 / ,

The Jewish presence in Porto predates the very existence of the city, but the earliest records date back to the 12th century, when many Jewish merchants had settled in Ribeira.

The first known synagogue has appeared on the hill of the Cathedral. Later on, in the 14th century, there was another prayer house in the current Rua do Comércio do Porto, near the Palácio da Bolsa.  Judiaria de Monchique (Monchique Jewish quarter), is part of the city where, even today, the Jewish presence is visible in the name of the place. There also used to be a synagogue of great importance. The sign commemorating its inauguration is in permanent exhibition at Museu do Carmo in Lisbon. The Jewish cemetery would be near the place where Passeio das Virtudes is located.

In the same century, the Judiaria do Olival (Olival Jewish quarter) was  built, which also had a majestic  synagogue that  later on gave way to the Mosteiro São Bento da Vitória (Monastery of St. Benedict of Victory). The Inquisition and the forced conversion of many Jews left their mark in Porto as well. In the seventeenth century many Jews left the city.

In the twentieth century, the Kadoorie Mekor Haim Synagogue (at Guerra Junqueiro Street, 340) was built, the largest in the Iberian Peninsula.

Club of “weird jerseys”
11 March, 2017 /

Portuguese champion in 2000/01, Boavista has over 100 years of history. Established by the British, it stood out in the 90’s. The checkered jerseys led it to become known in Italy as “the club of weird jerseys.”

The British, which due to the business of Port Wine had a large community in the city, introduced football in Porto. The Boavista Footballers was set up in 1903, but few years later, due to a disagreement concerning the days when the matches should be held – the Portuguese preferred to play on Sundays whereas the British wanted to play on Saturdays – resulted in the subjects of His Majesty walking out on the club.

As Boavista  Futebol Clube, it had a strong growth over the following decades. The main feature was winning the Portuguese Championship in 2000/01, but participation in European competition had been going on for some years. And it was in 1991/92 during a UEFA Cup qualifying match against Inter Milan, came up the nickname “club of weird jerseys,” an allusion to the black  and white checkered jerseys.

The Bessa Stadium, renovated for Euro 2004, has a museum with the history of the club, a walk of fame and two sculptures by José Rodrigues in which the panther, the club symbol , is highlighted.

Commercial Association of Porto – 181 years of history
6 March, 2017 /

Despite the fact that it was officially founded in December 1834, the Commercial Association of Porto which dates back to the twelfth century, when trade and tradesmen, especially in coastal areas, were gaining more power.

Over the centuries, owing to its strategic location and the entrepreneurial spirit of its people, the city of Porto acquired great importance, becoming an important financial center in Europe and the world. It was at this stage that a shared “Trust fund” was established, created by merchants to cover risks and shipment losses of their commodities. This fund was recognized in 1295 by King Dinis and in 1402 by King John I.

However, until 1834 there was no organization of traders with legal status and competent to meet the needs of local entrepreneurs. At this point, meetings, the exchange of information, business and auctions were held in the “Juntina”, located at the then Rua dos Ingleses. After the Liberal Revolution of 1822 and the enactment of the Commercial Code, the Juntina was the basis of the founding of the Porto Commercial Association, which is currently the second oldest Chamber of Commerce and Industry in Portugal mainland.

 

January 31, 1891 – A revolution that ended in bloodshed
3 March, 2017 / ,

On January 31, 1891, the first attempt to establish the Republic took place in Porto. Discontented with the economic crisis and a British-launched Ultimatum, which called into question the Portuguese presence in Africa, a group of influential northern men led dozens of soldiers toward the center of the city with the intention of taking the Post Office and Telegraphs and proclaim the Republic. They were eventually blocked by the municipal guard, faithful to the Monarchy and placed on the steps of the Church of Santo Ildefonso.

The Republic came to be proclaimed on the balcony of the City Hall, which would be the last stronghold of the rebels. Those who did not die in the battle would eventually be taken to ships stationed at Leixões. Others managed to escape abroad. The Republic would only be proclaimed in 1910.

The memory of this date still remains today in the toponymy of the city, with Rua 31 de Janeiro, in downtown Porto, as well as in the streets that have the names of the authors of this frustrated revolution: Alves da Veiga, Rodrigues de Freitas or Alferes Malheiro.

Source: O Tripeiro (New Series) Year X number 1