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Fernando Távora – The Master of “Porto School”
3 March, 2017 /

He was one of the most renowned names in Portuguese architecture and the “father” of the so-called “Porto School”.

Born on August 25, 1923, in Porto, Fernando Távora was from a conservative family, descendant of the noble lineage of the Távoras. His first years of life were spent on family estates in Minho, in Bairrada and on the beaches of Foz do Douro. From an early age he showed a great aptitude for drawing and an avid interest in old houses. Contrary to the wishes of the family, who wanted him to study Civil Engineering, he enrolled at the Porto School of Fine Arts in 1941 to study Architecture.

He was a professor at institutions such as the School of Fine Arts of Porto (ESBAP), the Faculty of Architecture of the University of Porto (FAUP) – which he helped establish – and at the University of Coimbra. Founder of the so-called “Escola do Porto”, he was one of the great influences of other great names of national architecture such as Siza Vieira.

In addition to several works that he designed, and which reflect creativity, functionality, but also social responsibility, he equally contributed in the area of ​​heritage conservation and restoration.

Fernando Távora died on September 3, 2005.

Some of the most emblematic works:

  • Municipal Market of Santa Maria da Feira
  • Tennis pavilion and outdoor arrangements at Quinta da Conceição, Matosinhos
  • Restoration and adaptation of the Convent of Santa Marinha and Pousada, Guimarães
  • General plan of the Urbanization of Guimarães
  • Remodeling and expansion of the National Museum of Soares dos Reis, Porto
  • Restoration and adaptation of the Palácio do Freixo and Pousada, Porto
  • Casa dos 24, Porto (Historic Town Hall)
Eugénio de Andrade
2 March, 2017 /

Eugénio de Andrade, one of the most translated Portuguese poets, kept a strong connection to Porto for much of his life.

Although he was born in Fundão, Eugénio de Andrade (whose real name was José Fontinhas), lived in Porto for more than 50 years, until his death on June 13, 2005. He arrived in Oporto in the 50’s. At that time and although he already had written works, his position was an administrative inspector of the Ministry of Health and it was for this reason, following a transfer that he came to live in the city. Later he would receive the title of honorary citizen.

Author of several works that earned him national awards and international distinctions, he was also a translator of works by authors such as Federico García Lorca and Jorge Luís Borges. Among the several poetic anthologies of which he was the author, the one dedicated to Porto (Daqui Houve Nome Portugal, 1968) stands out. Although he cultivated strong relations of friendship with other writers and artists, he was discreet. He did not like to give interviews or attend social and cultural events.

He lived for many years at 111 Rua Duque de Palmela, but from 1994 until his death he lived in the Casa Serrúbia, in Rua do Passeio Alegre, in Foz do Douro. This house would become the headquarters of the Eugénio de Andrade Foundation for some time. His manuscripts and other documentation are currently in the Special Collections Room of the Municipal Public Library of Porto.

Not far from here, in the Prado do Repouso Cemetery stands the tomb of Eugénio de Andrade: a white shallow marble grave, designed by his friend Siza Vieira, in which verses of his book “The Hands and the Fruits” are inscribed.

Citations:

“The wisdom of the poet is a second innocence”

“One word is like a note that looks for others for a perfect chord”